9 of The Best Jobs for Early Risers

If you prefer to start your day with the sun, one of these jobs might be a perfect fit.

The early bird catches the worm, as they say. And if you’re a morning person looking to snag a job in your pique hours, start polishing that resume.

The reality is, early risers have a unique opportunity to make bank before most people have even had their morning coffee. So don’t sleep on these early bird opportunities. For those who prefer to get up early and get a head start, these are some of the best gigs around.

Mail Carrier

If you prefer to be outside while you work, you might want to pick up a mail route. You’ll often be walking/driving around as the day begins and working alone. As a mail career, you’ll be making designated rounds in areas you’ll become familiar with, delivering letters and packages, and interacting with residents who live along your route.

Most notably, shifts typically end when you’re done with your daily duties in the early afternoon.

Generally, post office workers show up bright and early for morning shifts. They get the daily mail organized and head out on their routes. There’s a lot of freedom in being a mail carrier, but there’s also a lot of responsibility too. If you’re up for the job, there are only a few qualifications that you absolutely must meet:

  • You must be at least 18 years old
  • You must be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident
  • You need to show proof of a good driving record and be able to pass various screenings, including criminal background checks and medical checks.

Currently, the national average salary for mail carriers is $36,036. According to Indeed, hourly pay is approximately $17.93. If this job sounds up your alley, prepare to do some serious walking on occasion. Some mail carriers walk up to 12 miles a day, so invest in good shoes.

Barista

I spent many years working as a barista and over time, I wound up working many shifts. Even though I am not what one might consider “a morning person,” my favorite shift was from 4 am to 2 pm. The commute was quiet, I got to see the sun come up, and I was the only person in the shop until patrons started trickling in when we opened at 6 am.

The morning crowds were also the most consistent. In the coffee world, the people who get a cup of joe before work tend to be business folk and true morning people out to get a jump start on their day, getting their same caffeinated beverage choice and going on their way.

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Any barista will tell you, there is a rhythm to the morning shift that’s different from the rest of the day and then you’re typically clocked out by the early afternoon, and with a few tips in your pocket.

Generally, baristas who work the morning shift are required to open up shop, brew the first rounds of coffee, prepare drinks, serve customers, clean as needed, run the register, and restock everything before the midday barista arrives. Even if you don’t have experience, many coffee shops are happy to train, especially those who are willing to take the early shift.

According to Zip Recruiter, baristas make $26,122 a year, on average (not counting tips and easy coffee access).

Baker

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In coffee shops, cafes, and bakeries, the baker often comes in first thing in the morning. If you know your way around a bakery already and you don’t feel like working for someone else, perhaps you want to start your own business.

On the other hand, if you lack experience, it’s time to infiltrate the food industry and start working towards getting a foot in a bakery door. No matter what route you take, baker hours tend to be early morning hours. Per Salary.com, the average baker’s salary currently ranges from $29,860 and $40,854.

Read More: The Biggest Mistakes Small Business Owners Make

TSA Agent

If you feel comfortable enforcing security protocols and handling the occasional airport crisis and chaos, you might make a great TSA (Transportation Security Administration) agent.

While on the lookout for potentially dangerous and prohibited items, you’ll be required to screen passengers, cargo, and luggage, and you’ll often have to do so first thing in the morning.

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As a TSA agent, you’ll be required to keep things running smoothly, including airport foot traffic at security checkpoints. If you are an early riser who is detail-oriented, level-headed, comfortable being on your feet for long periods, adaptable, and able to keep your cool in tense situations, this might be a career path worth serious consideration.

According to Indeed, TSA agents make approximately $40,981 annually, on average.

Flight Attendant

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Want to spend your mornings traveling by air and arriving in different cities all the time? You may be in luck. Airlines are always seeking flight attendants. While the positions are historically easy to fill, airlines are always in need of more people to work on planes.

Many flights start boarding around 7 a.m., but flight attendants are required to be there long before that. Requirements may vary from airline to airline, but all flight attendants are typically required to be at least 21 years old. As far as education, you will likely only be expected to have a high school diploma or GED.

According to Glassdoor, the average salary for flight attendants is currently between $31,800 to $39,814.

Dog Walker

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If you’re looking for part-time morning work and enjoy spending time with animals, dog walkers are more sought-after than ever. Thanks to easy-to-use platforms like Rover, working as a dog walker is an easy way to be your own boss and build a potentially lucrative business.

You’ll be directly connected with pet owners looking for those who offer pet sitting services and have dog walking availability. Many people with regular 9 to 5s (and sometimes lengthy commutes) don’t have time to walk their dog each morning. That’s where you will come in and take their precious pet out for a stroll.

Most notably, you can potentially earn up to $1,000 per month, even if you only work early in the day.

Read More: Great Part-Time Jobs for Retirees

House Cleaner

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Many people are busy and could use some extra help around the house. In turn, house cleaning jobs are some of the most lucrative, consistent jobs around.

There are a lot of great things about being a house cleaner. Not only will there always be work, but you’ll be getting great exercise, often at the start of your day. And generally, you’ll get to choose how often you work. Most times, house cleaning roles are best suited for those who like to work in the morning. Per Indeed, the average salary for a house cleaner is $17.04 per hour.

Personal Trainer

Personal trainers have the freedom to set their own rates and hours. This flexibility makes it an appealing career option for those who prefer to work in the morning. Based on their own work schedule and desire to get their workouts over with, many clients prefer early morning sessions and that will consistently work in an early bird’s favor.

Getting personal trainer certification isn’t difficult. But the certification itself can cost between $200 and $900 dollars, so shop around for something that’s accredited, but affordable. Before you can start working, you will be required to take tests on a plethora of related information, put in training hours at a facility, and become first aid and CPR qualified.

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You will likely be busiest in the morning, but you can build a schedule working with various clients at all hours of the day. Once you’re certified, you can either work in a gym as a trainer or work completely for yourself.

If dedicated and popular with clients, personal trainers can make a pretty penny. The current salary range is between $23,000 and $80,000 per year.

Freelancer

Typically, freelancers are able to set their own hours, work on their own time, and decide their own terms and rates. If you are self-sufficient, prefer to work independently, and you’re able to meet deadlines, working as a freelancer can be very fulfilling and flexible.

In most cases, you won’t be required to have formal training, but you’ll need to show you can do the work. So put your best foot forward. For instance, some companies require freelance writers to take timed writing tests, but most prefer to see your portfolio. You’ll be asked to submit 1 to 3 writing samples, preferably published pieces.

If you dream of working remotely and have confidence in your creative abilities, freelancing might be worth trying out, even on a part-time basis.

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Freelancing can give you a chance for variety, creativity, and independence. If you’re working for a company that pays you by the hour and treats you like staff, you’ll likely be required to keep office hours and follow protocol. Even still, you will typically be free to establish what hours you work and how often, with the exception of company meetings.

Currently, the national average for a freelancer is $67,169 per year, but freelance salaries vary greatly. However, even part-timers can make up to $32 an hour if they choose projects wisely.

Ultimately, you’ll be able to set a schedule that best suits you. You can start working at 4 am and have worked a full day by 11 am. And you can work when you feel most inspired. Freelancers who’ve been at it a while often suggest trying different hours and seeing where and when you feel the most productive. So if you know you work best in the mornings, you’re already a step ahead.

Read More: Top Freelance Jobs to Earn a Steady, Growable Income

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